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Organizational

  • Promoting the BWC motto which states: Beauty Without Cruelty is a way of life which causes no creature of land, sea or air, terror, torture or death.
  • Locating and investigating animal exploitation, particularly for commercial gain.
  • Conducting awareness programs in educational institutions and other places to spread the message of compassion and kindness for animals. BWC encourages a veg lifestyle i.e. an animal-free diet, without the use of any animal products. The BWC Pledge Form helps in upholding convictions and beliefs. See http://www.bwcindia.org/Web/PlayYourPart/PledgeForm.pdf
  • Conducting research on various products and processes in order to ascertain whether vegan/vegetarian/non-vegetarian.
  • Documenting, printing, distributing and uploading on our website up-to-date information gathered so as to encourage people to use only non-animal origin items based on the premise that if there is no demand the supply will diminish.
  • Producing printed and e-versions of publications like Compassionate Friend, Karuna-Mitra, Hinsa vs. Ahinsa, BWC Investment Guide and BWC Calendar; and awareness creating posters, leaflets, stickers, etc.
  • Creating public awareness of different issues related to animals on particular days throughout the year via Hinsa vs. Ahinsa e-mailers.
  • Approaching Government to amend and make new rules and laws that alleviate animal exploitation, suffering, and death. BWC also takes legal action to save animals, should the need arise.
Category: Organizational
  • Constraints in the form of people and resources hold BWC back from carrying out much more, but whatever has been undertaken as listed below, is with wholehearted perseverance and sincerity:
  • BWC has been trying for years to convince the Government to make the Veg and Non-veg symbols (currently affixed on packaged food articles) also mandatory for cosmetics, toiletries, drugs and all other consumer items.
  • BWC would like the testing of consumer products on animals to be banned.
  • BWC feels greyhound/dog racing should never be legalized and therefore continuously approaches politicians and officials to stop import, training (hunting) and racing events.
  • BWC condemns fishing and releasing of mahseer and other protected fish, and wants a ban on this cruelty.
  • BWC has been systematically objecting to the setting up of aquatic parks and looks forward to them being halted.
  • BWC wants a ban on ornamental fish.
  • BWC feels wildlife should remain unhindered in the wild, not jailed in zoos where conservation, education and research purposes as claimed are far from achieved.
  • BWC wants the Government to impose a ban on the import, poaching, trade and caging of all birds, Indian and foreign.
  • BWC has for years been approaching the Government to place a ban on the import, manufacture, sale, purchase and use of catapults.
  • BWC feels a ban on manja used to fly kites is also long over-due.
  • BWC wants to see the end to bursting firecrackers that result in sound and air pollution causing distress and harm to animals, birds, the environment – and humans.
  • BWC strongly objects to the use of live bait, such as calves, dogs, and goats, for entertainment or for trapping wildlife.
  • BWC wants Government to take appropriate and timely steps to stop elephants being hit on railway tracks.
  • BWC hopes to be able to convince the Government to ban the trade and use of peacock feathers.
  • BWC wants a ban on films and advertisements for which animals have been subjected to cruelty – whether in India or abroad.
  • BWC looks forward to the day when circuses have no birds, fish, and animals in their performances or display them.
  • BWC sees no joy in “joy-rides” and wants camels, ponies, elephants, etc. to be spared.
  • BWC has pointed out that imported reptile-skin items are no different to those of Indian origin and should, therefore, be banned as well.
  • BWC feels that like many other countries, India should also ban the import of pâté de foie gras and other non-veg “gourmet” foods.
  • BWC wants the Government to firmly clamp down on the import of knick-knacks made from cat and dog fur.
  • BWC wants a ban on all animal sacrifices.
  • BWC does not believe in genetic modification of animals or vegetables, particularly if animal genes are inserted into vegetables.
  • BWC is in favor of implementation of a total ban on tail-docking, ear-cropping, de-barking, filing teeth and removing dewclaw of dogs.
  • BWC wants the Government to stop emus, ostriches, turkeys, quails, and ducks being bred for their meat and feathers.
  • BWC also wants a ban on breeding of rabbits for their fur and meat.
  • BWC doesn’t want to see any expansion of, or new, abattoirs.
  • BWC wants the Government to come down heavily on smuggling of animals for meat, leather, and religious sacrifices, across the Indo-Bangladesh and Indo-Nepal borders halted.
  • BWC creates an awareness of intensive farming (animals specially bred and raised to be killed) of poultry, sheep, goats, and also exploitation of milch cattle and particularly male calves by the dairy industry.
  • BWC alerts Police and Government officials about violation of laws, e.g. illegal bullock-cart races.
  • Last but not least, BWC would like the Government to recognize and acknowledge that animals (all living creatures other than humans) are sentient beings having rights and legal status.
Category: Organizational
BWC has withdrawn the Veg Shopper’s Guide. To know why please read Veg Shopper’s Guide
Category: Organizational
Many years back BWC ran out of copies of this book. Moreover a considerable amount of information contained in the book is irrelevant today.
Category: Organizational
Unfortunately, the BWC charity’s international headquarters in UK no longer exists. Whatever support we received was only in the initial stages. BWC India has since its inception in 1974 been totally independent by managing its own finances, generating its own resources, and deciding upon its projects.
Category: Organizational
BWC India has no connection whatsoever with the BWC cosmetic company. When the BWC charity in UK closed, the company owned by them was sold. Despite a continuous correspondence spanning a couple of years, BWC India was not at all satisfied that all the ingredients used by BWC Cosmetics were free of animal substances.
Category: Organizational
No, BWC does not have branches or centres in the other cities of India. However, BWC has appointed a few dedicated members as Executives, and they spread our message in different parts of India.
Category: Organizational
At present Compassionate Friend in English is the only magazine published. But, BWC re-started Karuna-Mitra as a four-page quarterly newsletter. Monsoon 2011 issue onwards all members began receiving both publications. However, Satvanukampa started in 1981, has not be published since 1990.
Category: Organizational
Membership is open to all: vegan, vegetarians and non-vegetarians. Life membership of BWC is Rs.300. Educational institutions pay Rs.100 annually (a lump-sum of Rs.500 for 5 years preferred) and corporate bodies Rs.1000 annually. Please see http://www.bwcindia.org/Web/PlayYourPart/SupportTheCause.html
Category: Organizational
You certainly can. There is a section in the membership form where you can mark it as gift membership. We also have a special gift life membership form. Please see BWCLMGift
Category: Organizational
Category: Organizational
Category: Organizational
Category: Organizational
Category: Organizational
All donations made to BWC are exempted from tax under Section 80-G of Income Tax Act, 1961. Please see 80-G To download the donation form (not essential to give filled form with donation) please go to BWCDonationForm
Category: Organizational

Issue Based

No, ethically eggs are unacceptable to BWC. Our stand conforms to the Indian concept of “pure vegetarianism” (lacto-vegetarianism). Furthermore, the Government of India classifies eggs as non-vegetarian and if used as an ingredient in packaged foods, the Non-veg symbol is required to be displayed on such products..


Category: Issue Based
While BWC recognizes the harm done to animals in the dairy industry and therefore promotes and encourages veganism, it does not yet accord to itself the status of a vegan organization. However, many of our members and some of our trustees are vegans – they do not consume milk, honey, varkh and shellac, or use leather, fur, silk and wool.


Category: Issue Based
BWC does not believe in or support so-called humane slaughter because there can be nothing humane in murder. Killing is totally unacceptable to BWC.


Category: Issue Based
BWC does not believe in turning animal welfare to animal farewell via so-called mercy killing. BWC emphatically condemns all killing. Each and every life wants to live, and BWC upholds its right to live.


Category: Issue Based
BWC is a specialist NGO. It works for the commercial exploitation of animals only. It therefore does not have a program for dealing with stray animals. While we encourage neutering the animals and a no-kill animal birth control program, our constitution does not include work for stray animals. We would therefore gladly put you in touch with relevant organizations who do work for stray dogs, cattle, etc.


Category: Issue Based
Yes, legal action can be taken against them since they are all unauthorized and illegal. (Slaughter can only take place in designated places.) However, knowing the situation of corruption and connivance between the law enforcement authorities and the law breakers, such an action might not be effective or advisable and we would like to warn people against taking rash steps that could invite physical retaliation resulting in harm. However, for the record, the action that may be taken is as follows: give a complaint in writing to the local municipal authorities about possible encroachment by the butcher and conducting of unlicensed activity, and asking them to remove the structure and get the business stopped. For security reasons make sure that such a petition is signed by a group and not you as an individual.


Category: Issue Based
No. The word organic means derived from living organisms – vegetable and animal. Organic fertilisers or manure (commonly thought of as cattle dung and poultry poop) could very well have in addition to plant waste, added ingredients like bone, blood and other animal body parts such as chicken feathers, ground egg shells and dried fish. Organic only implies that no agrochemicals such as pesticides, insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, fumigants, rodenticides, complex fertilisers, etc. that are harmful to human health have been utilised. These pesticides indiscriminately kill life in the soil like lady-bugs and worms, considered farmers’ friends. They can kill birds too.


Category: Issue Based

Animal Rights

Animal sentience is the basis of animal rights. Sentience is the ability to feel and experience sensations – since animals can suffer, it accords them animal rights. For animals to truly benefit, the recognition of animals as sentient beings must be legally acknowledged.


Category: Animal Rights
We are not saying that humans and other animals are equal in every way. For example, we are not saying that dogs and cats can do calculus, or that pigs and cows enjoy poetry. What we are saying is that, like humans, many other animals are psychological beings, with an experiential welfare of their own. In this sense, we and they are the same. In this sense, therefore, despite our many differences, we and they are equal.


Category: Animal Rights
We are not saying that humans and other animals always have the same rights. Not even all human beings have the same rights. For example, people with serious mental disadvantages do not have a right to higher education. What we are saying is that these and other humans share a basic moral right with other animals — namely, the right to be treated with respect.


Category: Animal Rights
Many animals are like us: they have a psychological welfare of their own. Like us, therefore, these animals have a right to be treated with respect. On the other hand, we have no reason, and certainly no scientific one, to believe that carrots and tomatoes, for example, bring a psychological presence to the world. Like all other vegetables, carrots and tomatoes lack anything resembling a brain or central nervous system. Because they are deficient in these respects, there is no reason to think of vegetables as psychological beings, with the capacity to experience pleasure and pain, for example. It is for these reasons that one can rationally affirm rights in the case of animals and deny them in the case of vegetables.


Category: Animal Rights
It often is not easy to know exactly where to ‘draw the line’. For example, we cannot say exactly how old someone must be to be old, or how tall someone must be to be tall. However, we can say, with certainty, that someone who is eighty-eight is old, and that another person who is 7’ 1” is tall. Similarly, we cannot say exactly where to draw the line when it comes to those animals that have psychology. But we can say with absolute certainty that, wherever one draws the line on scientific grounds, primates and rodents are on one side of it (the psychological side), whereas slugs and amoebas are on the other — which does not mean that we may destroy them unthinkingly.


Category: Animal Rights
It is true that some animals, like shrimp and clams, may be capable of experiencing pain yet lack most other psychological capacities. If this is true, then they will lack some of the rights that other animals possess. However, there can be no moral justification for causing anyone pain — if it is unnecessary to do so. And since it is not necessary that humans eat shrimp, clams and similar animals, or utilise them in other ways, there can be no moral justification for causing them the pain that invariably accompanies such use.


Category: Animal Rights
There are many situations in which an individual who has rights is unable to respect the rights of others. This is true of infants, young children, and mentally enfeebled and deranged human beings. In their case we do not say that it is perfectly all right to treat them disrespectfully because they do not honour our rights. On the contrary, we recognise that we have a duty to treat them with respect, even though they have no duty to treat us in the same way. What is true of cases involving infants, children, and other humans mentioned, is no less true of cases involving other animals. Granted, these animals do not have a duty to respect our rights. But this does not erase or diminish our obligation to respect theirs.


Category: Animal Rights
Not all religions represent humans as having ‘dominion’ over other animals, and even among those that do, the notion of ‘dominion’ should be understood as unselfish guardianship, not selfish power. Humans are to be as loving toward all of creation as God was in creating it. If we loved the animals today in the way humans loved them in the Garden of Eden, we would not eat them. Those who respect the rights of animals are embarked on a journey back to Eden — a journey back to a proper love for God’s creation. And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat. — Genesis 1:29


Category: Animal Rights
Many religions teach that all animals, not just humans, have immortal souls. However, even if only humans are immortal, this would only prove that we live forever whereas other animals do not. And this fact (if it is a fact) would increase, not decrease, our obligation to insure that this — the only life other animals have — be as long and as good as possible.


Category: Animal Rights
Somewhere between 4-5 billion animals are raised and slaughtered for food every year, just in the United States. The reason for this astonishingly high number is simple: there are consumers who eat very large amounts of animal flesh. The supply of animals meets the demand of buyers. When the philosophy of animal rights triumphs, however, and people become vegetarians, we need not fear that there will be billions of cows and pigs grazing in the middle of our cities or in our living rooms. Once the financial incentive for raising billions of these animals evaporates, there simply will not be billions of these animals. And the same reasoning applies in other cases — in the case of animals bred for research, for example. When the philosophy of animal rights prevails, and this use of these animals cease, then the financial incentive for breeding millions of them will cease, too.


Category: Animal Rights
The animal rights movement stands as part of, not apart from, the human rights movement. The same philosophy that insists upon and defends the rights of non-human animals also insists upon and defends the rights of human beings. At a practical level, moreover, the choice thoughtful people face is not between helping humans and helping other animals. One can do both. People do not need to eat animals in order to help the homeless, for example, any more than they need to use cosmetics that have been tested on animals in order to help children. In fact, people who do respect the rights of non-human animals, by not eating them, will be healthier, in which case they actually will be able to help human beings even more.


Category: Animal Rights